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Old August 19th, 2014, 07:11 AM
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Default Transporting Equipment

We were fortunate to purchase a used 2' x 8' evaporator and other miscellaneous equipment but now face the prospect of transporting it on a journey of several hours. We have a pick up truck and large flatbed trailer so space is not an issue; things just need to be well-organized and secure. The flue pan is a Leader Max so it is quite deep. There are several miscellaneous things too, including a stand, a long table, and a small tank, as well as chimney and steam stacks. My concern of course is how to transport everything without damage. Should the flue pan be moved upside down?
The arch is bricked. I see it being placed on the trailer with the firebox centred over the axle. Does that make sense?
We have access to lots of cardboard and bubble wrap. I see duct tape involved too.
All suggestions are welcome.
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Steve
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Old August 19th, 2014, 09:08 AM
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I just love trailers........................Slightly forward of the center of the axels with the heavy section forward. Use a few good web straps and put over the leg areas so you don't bow the arch. I transported my unit 1300 miles (oil fired) in place on the arch. Put some plywood pads under the legs if the trailer bed looks sketchy. I believe your at the mercy of the quality of the brick job as far as if it will stay in place. I like running the web straps over and around the item to keep it from creeping on the trailer. More straps with less tension is better than taking a cheater bar to one strap.
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Old August 19th, 2014, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Haynes Forest Products View Post
I just love trailers........................ Slightly forward of the center of the axels with the heavy section forward. Use a few good web straps and put over the leg areas so you don't bow the arch.
Sounds like a good idea

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I transported my unit 1300 miles (oil fired) in place on the arch.
I am assuming you mean you left the pans sitting on the arch. If so, I like this idea too but not sure how to strap it there. I would think the arch would need its own straps due to its weight. Those straps would get in the way of the pans sitting on the arch. Maybe it would work with just the flue pan on top of the arch without the syrup pan so it could be centred on the length. The arch is then strapped to the trailer and the pan strapped to the arch. The syrup pan could easily be placed elsewhere.


Quote:
Put some plywood pads under the legs if the trailer bed looks sketchy. I believe your at the mercy of the quality of the brick job as far as if it will stay in place. I like running the web straps over and around the item to keep it from creeping on the trailer. More straps with less tension is better than taking a cheater bar to one strap.
The trailer is in good shape and yes, wrapping the straps around things helps keep them stable.

Thanks Haynes
Anyone else with suggestions?
Steve
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Old August 19th, 2014, 04:50 PM
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Default Transporting Equipment

If your worried about the bricking, take plywood and cut it to fit so it fits up against all 3 sides of the the firebox. Then cut 2x4 and wedge them up against the plywood to keep the bricking from moving.

Last edited by regor0; August 19th, 2014 at 05:46 PM.
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Old August 19th, 2014, 08:47 PM
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Better yet get some two-part expanding foam. Put a heavy plastic bag in the firebox then pour the foam. Use something to fill up the middle so you don't need to use all foam. I did this to move someone's 5 x 16 and it worked real well
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Old August 19th, 2014, 10:41 PM
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I have had to move an awful lot of printing equipment in my career and there is one single item I would not go without and that is stretch wrap. You can secure a lot of stuff with it, like holding pans on an arch, keeping doors closed tight. It also helps protect items from the elements and scratches. I keep a roll in my truck at all times. To stop shifting you can always spike down some cleats to the bed of the trailer. Throw some straps around the thing tight enough to secure it and use the cleats to hold it in place. I like the two suggestions on how to hold the bricking in place. Enjoy the new equipment!
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Old August 20th, 2014, 09:50 PM
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i guess my question would be is the fire brick in good shape??? if it could possibly use redoing, i would suggest pulling the brick out. then you'll be able to see what is there for insulation behind the brick and possibly be able to make your rig a little more efficient. it will also help with the move into it's new home if the brick is not installed
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Old August 20th, 2014, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Moser's Maple View Post
i guess my question would be is the fire brick in good shape??? if it could possibly use redoing, i would suggest pulling the brick out. then you'll be able to see what is there for insulation behind the brick and possibly be able to make your rig a little more efficient. it will also help with the move into it's new home if the brick is not installed
That's a good point. What constitutes a good bricking? I didn't get a good photo of the firebox but I will certainly check it out. It's only been used one winter so the bricks should not be deteriorated. Is it okay if there are a few cracks in the mortar between bricks? I know he said it was a heck of a job to install the bricks and the instructions were not very good.
Steve
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Old August 20th, 2014, 10:42 PM
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some cracking is normal. if only used 1 season then I would take the other suggestions and transport with the bricks installed.
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Old August 21st, 2014, 05:46 AM
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I've used these things for other, but similar applications, just more ideas.
A 2/3 filled exercise ball, or a few small ones, in the firebox, strapped in.
Memory foam strips and pieces in and around and under things. It really does help with vibration sensitive stuff.
Overall I look at the John Deere dealership transport truck for loading and securing. (the one that picks up and delivers tractors after service.) Good Anchors, Chains, straps, tire chalks, balanced load.
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