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Old February 4th, 2013, 11:54 AM
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Default Will a RO change the taste

Bought an RO and plumbed it in. Did the prewash and dealer got us up and running. Made some syrup and my family thinks it tastes different. We are trying to pinpoint the cause. We added red maples a filter press an ro new to us evap. new taps tubing tanks. Pretty much you name it we changed it from last year, we are going from a hobby to a business. So I'm looking for any ideas that might be a contributer. Syrup doesn't look bad, it is at the right density, everything was prewashed, and I m not afraid to use it, but just wondering if a ro could change taste.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 01:33 PM
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I have found as a large producer, the taste can and will change day to day, even hour to hour. It could be just the year or any number of things. I will find a huge change in taste from the beginning of one day to the end. And then again sometimes there will not be.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Cooper hill maple View Post
Made some syrup and my family thinks it tastes different.
With that many changes, it undoubtedly will taste different.

If the question closer to the subject line you posed, and is simply, "Will the use or non-use of RO change the taste of the syrup for a given batch of sap?", then the answer is NO, it will not.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 02:34 PM
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Im with Dr Perkins to many changes all at once. Its on the same level as buying all new pots and pans and the storage containers better fixing's. Now The family said it was differant........Was it Bad?
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Old February 4th, 2013, 04:06 PM
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Didnt have a lot of maple flavor or smell I m not sure what to think. I don't want to sell sub par product, and I'm not sure that it is, just not the same as last years.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 04:43 PM
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With not having the heat to the sap as long as what you were previously used to will make for less robust maple flavor. going from hobby with a flat pan to an r/o and large flue pan is a lot of reduced heat time. It will also not be as dark.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooper hill maple View Post
Didnt have a lot of maple flavor or smell I m not sure what to think. I don't want to sell sub par product, and I'm not sure that it is, just not the same as last years.
How high are you concentrating to?
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Old February 4th, 2013, 06:07 PM
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Didnt have a lot of maple flavor or smell
Then it wouldn't have had a lot of flavor or smell if you'd boiled it without processing it through an RO.
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Old February 4th, 2013, 06:07 PM
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8-10% I hope the heat time that sap was referring to is the answer. Anyone have an opinion about the red maples? Could they contribute to the change
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Old February 6th, 2013, 05:41 AM
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Default Taste change from Red Maples

I know nothing about RO's, as I don't have one. But two years ago I separated my red maple sap from my sugar maple sap and boiled separately. The syrups do taste differently, and I found the red maples to have a slightly more pronounced taste than the sugar maples. Red maple syrup was described as having a more buttery flavor or nutty flavor. It had a smoother mouth feel. Some testers prefered the red maple, some the sugar maple.

I have a family that has been in the syrup business since my late grandfather. I took the two syrups to a family gathering for them to taste. It was split pretty evenly, with the sugar maple edging the red maple slightly. But those who preferred the red maple did so with more passion. Myself I like both very much. This year I've added more red maples to my mix and I can taste the buttery flavor and smoother mouth feel. No longer separating them, that was a lot of work! But I find the mix to be superior to either alone. Yum!

My syrup has always been more flavorful than the commercial stuff I buy and try every year. Mine is a very small bush, 150 taps, and the water here is alkaline rather than neutral or acidic suggesting limestone. My guess is the less extensive the bush both in numbers and area tends toward less averaging of flavors from the blend of trees and different soils, and the less average and more unique the flavor of the syrup.
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