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Old April 9th, 2018, 12:49 AM
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Default Maple water?

Hi all I am looking to buy a property that has sugar maples. I have been perusing the posts here and see many experienced people. Have not seen any posts about maple water yet. Anyone here bottle and sell maple water? Thank you
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Old June 27th, 2018, 05:28 AM
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maple water? I am also waiting for the replies.
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Old June 29th, 2018, 06:41 AM
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A producer would need to be very large to warrant buying the equipment to properly bottle their own. There are a few bottlers who buy sap from producers, but I think the numbers needed for them to buy your sap are quite high. They want fresh sap and in the few thousand gal/day area before they will buy it.
That being said, it is far easier to sell sap to another maple producer who then makes it into syrup. Just find a local producer and work it out.
I'm a rather small producer and I buy sap on shares, I make it into syrup and the sap provider gets a % back in syrup. In my case, the % varies as the sap sugar % varies.
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Old July 3rd, 2018, 06:29 AM
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I think too many are trying to jump upon the wave of the Maple/Birch drink craze and their product is not what many would expect.

Spotted this one the other day at a discount store here in town(Ocean State Job Lots) and figured i’d Try it.

At first opening the can I get this smell that seems like a hint of Old Grade B syrup being used and then try it for taste kinda like got the taste of old sap(seltzer maybe causing this) like with a hint of grade b syrup added for flavor.

Certainly not going to buy another can it’s not 1/10 of what I thought it really would be like.
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Old July 3rd, 2018, 06:32 AM
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First pic didnít post for some reason?
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Old July 3rd, 2018, 06:39 AM
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Trying to post this

You can look them up on FB

Facebook/tretap
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Old September 29th, 2018, 03:21 PM
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"Maple water" is used pretty loosely. I've seen three options, actually four options.

1) fresh sap - about 60-70% of a farmer's sap crop is quality enough to bottle. However, the logistics of tree to bottle is too decentralized for a large scale bottling operation. Sap quality is highly subjective. Tree chemistry can change quickly. The weather can change quickly, too. There is also regulation for bottling a product that is not shelf stable that requires significant infrastructure.

The equipment and facility are typically large scale and too rigid in production scheduling (rightfully so) to allow for unpredictable mother nature. There is also this challenge: the people with the capital to invest in large scale sap production for the beverage industry aren't typically savvy in sap tasting. I cannot believe the poor quality people are passing as "sap". Likewise, I have been impressed with one company's quality. It tastes like sap out of a bucket on a spring day.

2) Permeate. A byproduct of syrup production. Sap is split into concentrate (sweeter sap) and Permeate (pure water). Permeate is pure water with very little TDS that passes through a semi-permeable membrane. There is risk of spoilage with permeate, however, much lower than raw sap. No flavor.

3) condensate. A by-product of syrup production. This is steam that has condensed into water. The quality is also dependent on sap quality. It also has less opportunity to spoil due to temperature (212) and lack of TDS. There is certainly higher risk of TSS than permeate. Some flavor.

4) beverage with syrup added as an ingredient. This can be a beverage that uses maple syrup as a base sweetener/flavor.

You can see the beverage industry is trying. However, the ability to scale a typical beverage is pretty straightforward when using a municipal water source. The cost of water can be $10/1000 gallons. So, $0.01/gallon and piped into your facility when you open a valve and mostly "clean". Contrast that with tree sap or sap byproduct. My estimate is $0.50/gal plus transport for sap and $0.10/gal plus transport for both permeate and condensate. Filtration and pretreatment will be needed.

Can it be done? Sure. But I've yet to see someone with all of the key components, capital, personality, technical skill, and contacts to make this happen economically. Plus one overarching theme: Maple farmers want to make maple syrup. If you ask my dad to buy his sap, you couldn't pay him enough. He loves to make syrup. You can tell some maple farmers are willing to part with sap. However, based on the quality of " maple water" in the market that I have tasted - the "maple water" company bought junk sap or managed to make good sap into junk sap.

Just my $0.02. I learn more every day. But this is how I see it.
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